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Transitional Service Agreement Definition

A Transitional Service Agreement (ASD) is concluded between the buyer and the seller, who envisages the seller to provide assistance to the infrastructure, such as accounting, IT and human resources, after the transaction is completed. TSA is common in situations where the buyer does not have the management or systems to absorb the acquisition, and the seller can offer it for a fee. Indira Gillingham, senior manager, and Mike Stimpson, senior manager at Deloitte Consulting LLP, provide practical advice on using ASD to achieve a quick and clear separation. An ASD can expedite the negotiation process and financial conclusion by allowing the agreement to be reached without waiting for the buyer to assume responsibility for all critical support services. A Transitional Service Agreement (ASD) offers significant benefits when used wisely, such as. B faster conclusion, smoother transition, lower transition costs, better end-of-life solutions and clean separation. However, divestitures that distort the TSA can take much longer than expected. What corrective measures apply to the buyer if the seller is not acting appropriately under the TSA? A seller may have little incentive to work in accordance with the service levels set out in the TSA and its supporting documents after the closure, unless there is explicitly liquidated damage that can be recovered by the buyer – standard compensation cannot provide adequate motivation. In order to ensure the greatest possible applicability, you should consider recouping a trust fund due to poor performance under the TSA (although this may be difficult to negotiate in the major M-A transaction). A Transitional Service Agreement (TSA) is an agreement between buyers and sellers, under which the seller concludes his services and know-how with the buyer for a certain period of time, in order to support and allow the buyer his new assets, infrastructure, systems, etc. Transition service agreements are common when a large company sells one of its activities or certain non-essential assets to a less demanding buyer or to a newly created company in which management is present, but where the back-office infrastructure has not yet been assembled.

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